WooWeekly Special Issue #400 (July 13th)

RM
Rodolfo Melogli
Jul 5th, 8:40am UTC
Posted anonymously
Jul 5th, 10:25am UTC
Hey, I'm James kemp - founder of Iconic (iconicwp.com) and Orderable (orderable.com).

The one thing I would fix in WooCommerce today is the checkout experience. The default checkout is lacking in this modern age. It is not optimised for conversions and does not encourage potential customers to finalise their purchases.

This is precisely why I recommend Iconic's Flux Checkout plugin. You can visually reduce the number of fields at checkout and guide potential customers through the process with minimal effort. Flux is wholly optimised for checkout conversions and our new "Modern" theme takes that one step further with a stunning design and UX.
CleanShot 2022-07-05 at [email protected] 391 KB | Download
Posted anonymously
Jul 5th, 6:39pm UTC
Two key aspects I would like to see improved:
  1. Code: support for multi-currency configurations by WooCommerce extensions. Although that's my core business, I would be happy to see such an important feature built-in directly in the core, as I've been suggesting since 2013. 
  2. Management: better support, both from the customer and from the support team perspective. I prepared a draft for a talk on this subject, but it wasn't selected for any event, so I didn't complete it.

Yours truly, Diego from Aelia.co (of course, who else? 😁)
Posted anonymously
Jul 6th, 6:33am UTC
I'm Dave Loodts from Belgium, building sites since 2006. Now specialized in WooCommerce via my company woofers.be. If i had to pick up one point for improvement: it's better experience on mobile. In particular the quantity selector on the product page. How old-skool can i be that mobile buyers click on a quantity field and an android/ios "popup opens up. You won't see this kind of behaviour on a shopify store. A better UX-experience would be to have "plus-minus" buttons.
And to continue on mobile UX:
In this Gutenberg era, we create and visually build sites in a desktop-enviremont; but the reality for shops is that the majority of buyers are mobile buyers. Just floating the right side under the left side is not always a good mobile UX experience. Fore example the WooCommerce Product Blocks; the product image is always on top. Is that really okay on mobile? Why not image left and title/price on the right side? A good exercise would be to look at the Amazons of this world; that kind of shops that have Conversion Experts running and designing it. You can learn a ton of it, how they switch from desktop to mobile.
There is this book called "Mobile First"; on how to think about Mobile Users first, and second desktop users. But still; "we" don't really follow that rule. And to be more baffled about this, that book is written in the year 2011 (!).  A decade ago. So, yes. Much improvement in that matter, but i'm also aware it's hard to switch this in an Open Source enviremont. But please make it a rule for every new block or feature, bringing on the best mobile UX possible.

Dan Knauss, Editor @ Post Status

There you go Rodolpho! I'm sorry about the odd feedback or echo...a slight ringing sound. I haven't seen that come up before on this laptop mic and space.

WooCommerce, like WordPress, has an admin interface focused on a huge array of options for the administrator or site builder — what they can do. It is not focused on how decisions made here directly impact what customers do — or don't do.

If I could change one thing, I would would significantly simplify the WooCommerce back-end experience according to the "decisions not options" philosophy. The first time a site builder logs into a new site, their experience should be focused on creating the best possible customer experience with the fewest possible choices.

For example, via wizards and a simplified interface emphasizing the impact of back-end settings on front-end experience, new site owners would learn not just how to build their site but how to empathize with their customers and understand the sales funnels from the customer's standpoint. Checkout and email notification settings would be prominent as key customer contact points to personalize and optimize sales. This wouldn't have to be an enormous change — at a minimum, it means emphasizing the decisions that will have the highest impact on customer experience and sales. 
DK
Dan Knauss
Jul 6th, 5:47pm UTC
Dan Knauss, Editor @ Post Status

There you go Rodolpho! I'm sorry about the odd feedback or echo...a slight ringing sound. I haven't seen that come up before on this laptop mic and space.

WooCommerce, like WordPress, has an admin interface focused on a huge array of options for the administrator or site builder — what they can do. It is not focused on how decisions made here directly impact what customers do — or don't do.

If I could change one thing, I would would significantly simplify the WooCommerce back-end experience according to the "decisions not options" philosophy. The first time a site builder logs into a new site, their experience should be focused on creating the best possible customer experience with the fewest possible choices.

For example, via wizards and a simplified interface emphasizing the impact of back-end settings on front-end experience, new site owners would learn not just how to build their site but how to empathize with their customers and understand the sales funnels from the customer's standpoint. Checkout and email notification settings would be prominent as key customer contact points to personalize and optimize sales. This wouldn't have to be an enormous change — at a minimum, it means emphasizing the decisions that will have the highest impact on customer experience and sales. 
ME
Michelle Eaton
Jul 6th, 8:25pm UTC
The biggest thing in WooCommerce I would fix is probably core documentation. The official WooCommerce documentation is lacking, and I have to rely on sites like yours just to know what hooks are available. Some of the pages even result in 404s, or haven't been updated in years. The paid plugins that WooCommerce sells stay more up to date, but the core plugin documentation gets forgotten.

Second to that, I would say adding more features either to core or Automattic/WooCommerce maintained free plugins. I develop WooCommerce sites, so I can write the plugins my clients need if something doesn't exist, but there are some features that should be standard in eCommerce that WooCommerce just doesn't have out of the gate. Adding a tracking number or link to an order should really be part of core, integrated into plugins like WooShipping, with it's own order status and email template. There isn't a plugin that does the job well without advertising other services, and I would wager that the majority of eCommerce sites need a feature like this. They don't need to add every possible ecommerce option, I just think there's some gaps in the basics. Tracking, Variation Swatches, Table Rate Shipping, a "Catalog Mode" - customizations that I find myself adding over and over again to almost every store I work with.
AG
Angel Garcia
Jul 8th, 2:25pm UTC
From the beginning I have had doubts with the woocommerce registration system when implementing it with other subscription plugins and differentiating them by rolls.
Posted anonymously
Jul 11th, 9:28am UTC
Saw your post on Woocommerce issues, agree with you on so many points and more, my thoughts below, i thought it a bit long and harsh on Woo to post/reply with it.

10 years of building our few sites, almost as good if not better than many devs i've come across, bar yourself and a few others of course :)  (its a 2nd job to me, keeping up and keeping my site the best it can be.)  

We live in hope! In the mean time, those without an unlimited pocket, learnt to build and develop and agreed a waste of valuable time, it wasn't meant to be like that, if there's slow progress with the theme as that good example you stated, then how's progress with the technical matters like CSP or DMARC, not widely enough known and little to no plans by most, poor debug without security risk of letting others log in, poor coding all to often, adverts galore and back doors constantly banging open and closed. I could add  many to your already long list.

On point about so much but 'hope' is often all i think we have, hope in ourselves that is, because like you say, premium is what it actually is, it seems free but free it is not, so it's either learn yourself and spend a few hundred to a few thousand pounds or bucks and 1000s of hours. Or spend 10k plus or more for someone else to do it.  

10k plus year in year out for a top notch site with all the bells and whistles. But then the value of our time spent learning/implementing/working daily if hired to make 80 plus plugins work where needed, 1 second loads, the true cost could be 30 to 80k or more of labour intensive value over a few years. 

Now that is premium and it takes hard graft to maintain! Granted you can spool up a blog or a shop in 2 mins near free which was a revolution in itself, but in comparison it is not the same as what it seems at first, not the same as a properly built site, all off loaded content, elastic search, server level cache, and yes dare i say CSP.

Just imagine if it was all in the box, free or at a reasonable cost.  

Dev VIP

T
Tommy
Jul 11th, 9:37am UTC
Hey, I'm Tommy from YayCommerce, the team behind YayMail - WooCommerce Email Customizer. 
One of the most sought-after features that I got from my own clients is dedicated email template for mobile devices. 
So far it is almost impossible to present a mobile responsive single-column table for WooCommerce Order details, Billing, Shipping address, etc. just like how the default email templates were sent by Shopify.
M
Michelle
Jul 11th, 5:32pm UTC
I love WooCommerce - it's a great way to display products and services, and so robust in features. It also has an amazing ecosystem of its own within WordPress that's quite impressive.

If I could change one thing, it would be to make shipping charges much easier to set up. It's the biggest headache when customers can choose multiple items in a store. It's also why I've always suggested one-price-shipping to all of my personal web clients. :)

Congratulations on 400 issues of WooWeekly! Keep up the good work!
MB
Marcus Burnette
Jul 11th, 5:39pm UTC
Hey Rodolfo - congrats on issue #400!!

WooCommerce is far and away the best eCommerce platform for WordPress (if not for the web in general). From the open-source nature of being able to contribute directly to the flexibility to develop on top of the platform, WooCommerce allows site builders and developers the ability to create just about any kind of store you need. Whether you want to create a multi-vendor marketplace, an online learning academy, sell physical goods, or any other kind of online commerce business, WooCommerce has you covered!

That being said, its power and versatility comes at the cost of simplicity. By its nature, WooCommerce is designed for scale. (There are simpler ways to sell a product or two with WordPress.) Setting up—and managing—large WooCommerce stores could certainly be easier. For small stores, the onboarding wizard helps set up some general store settings, but how should shipping settings be configured? What about tax collection? What are my payment acceptance options—and how do I know which one is best for my store? How do I sell my products on social media and third-party marketplaces? How do I handle cart abandonment? What if I also have a brick-and-mortar store to keep in sync? These questions (and many others) need answers for stores to grow and sell at scale and I'd love to see WooCommerce, the plugin, help answer them along the way at setup and as sales increase.

Marcus Burnette
WooCommerce Specialist on the GoDaddy Pro Field Team (sharing about GoDaddy Pro, The Hub, and our WordPress and WooCommerce efforts in the community and at events)